Mayumba, Gabon
Date: Lodging: Distance: Total:
21/05/2000 Mayumba Safari Club 197 KM 74604 KM

PHOTOS
 
Mosquito netting, flashlights and mosquito repellant are standard nighttime basics in the rain forest.

On the road we rarely pass a woman whose basket is not overflowing with a heavy load.


 
Millions of magnificent trees fill the rain forest but this one stopped us in awe, especially the base.

Our four-wheel drive gets us through.


 
Fortunately people help clear the road so they, too, can pass.

The rainy season often leads to blocked roads.


 
Magnificent palms are all over this section of Gabon.


 
PAIGE'S NOTES
 
21 May 2000 - We drove along slick, dirt paths that were not as bad as we'd anticipated. Reaching a massive, mud hole, we found a truck's right rear wheel firmly stuck. I had complete confidence we could make it through the deeper mud hole beside the stuck truck, but Jim wanted to pass where the truck sat. He inspected the hole and offered our rope for another truck to pull out the sunken one. After the truck escaped the mud, Jim placed bamboo branches over the pass to help our traction. With no problem Jim drove through the pass.

Several hours later we reached 'home' for the night - an old lodge with bungalows nestled in a beautiful nook overlooking a wide river. We ended up giving 20 liters of diesel to the patron allowing us four hours of electricity for charging batteries, computers and eating in the light. The Safari Hotel, built in 1976, could be fabulous but none of the buildings have seen investment since the opening. In front of the lodge sat a large swimming pool empty except for a little rainwater, bugs and mud. However the bungalows were clean, which is the number one attribute in my book these days.

Unfortunately though mosquitoes flourish here in the jungle setting and already I am covered head to toe in bites. Each of my arms has 20 red welts and my feet are completely topped with bites. Perhaps there is a hole in my mosquito net!

 

VIDEO
 
  To Mayumba
AUDIO
 
  Better than expected drive (Jim)